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>> down through history, all people have struggled for land. in israel, however, the struggle takes on yet another dimension. somehow, the land is infused with the holy, and the quest for sovereignty, for political peace, is wrapped up in identity and relationship. in fact, as we talk to religious leaders, political leaders, and the average person on the street, we'll find out that sorting out this difficult and tangled issue over land is really the key to pce in israel in the future. in order to get a better understanding of land issues in israel, we were very fortunate to speak with dr. menachem lorberbaum at the hartman institute, where he's director of the center for jewish political thought. this center provides a voice of reason and passionate understanding in a society that is increasingly polarized by issues over land, religion, the ethical dimension, and its impact on society. >> well, the issue of land has been an issue for a century also in the zionist movement. first of all, sovereignty needs territory. sovereignty presumes territory. and therefore, the question of terri
of the tensions between religion, and the spot we picked on, dare i say, was israel and then to some extent egypt. and we wanted to go to israel in particular because there isn't such a diverse cultural environment in terms of religion, so that the tensions are, in some senses, watered down. as we all know, unless you've been meditating in a cave for the past 20 years, israel and the social environment in israel is very tense in terms of the relationship between the three great faiths that actually share something of a cultural tradition- judaism, christianity, and islam. and so what we- we have an extraordinary opportunity, and something like a great risk. i'm surprised david ainsworth, our executive producer, hasn't come out and read this e-mail message i sent to him about three days before we're ready to go on this journey. we planned it of course for several months. we're talking about a crew of at least six people- a lot of preparation, and of course, at the time when we were set to go was one of the worst possible times in terms of the tension; you know, again, another flare-up between the
? >> and that's so true and so frustrating, and in the next class we'll look specifically at israel because we had the opportunity to go there. and how incredibly complex, because on one hand, from the zionist movement, israel is a secular state. but how do jewish people define their identity, they're so diverse? well, it's usually through religion. and so even within israel, that creates a tension. i mean, is it possible outside of the monastery for people to live up to the highest ideals that we want to look at in the ethical dimension. and here we're thinking about in judaism and christianity the ten commandments or the eightfold path in buddhism, or any of the ideals, the precepts in religions- but how hard it is. >> my friend who's jewish said that she feels that it's- the people in that area do get along well; it's just strictly the government and that that's causing- you know, they get along well in their private lives, but the other thing enters into it and causes the whole situation, the havoc and the killing and such. >> and i've experienced that personally in a number of instances,
-in footages that we had over in israel here- i want to bring those in- let me move first to our first roll-in and look at islam in israel. you know, you would imagine there'd be some tension there, but there's a very vital and viable community there. we had an opportunity to go to the dome of the rock, and the al- aqsa mosque, and this is just a very short piece because it took forever to try to get in there with the cameras- they were not going to let us in. and to add to the tension, as we were trying to get in through the doorway to get into the arab or the muslim area, i should say, they hauled out a young jewish fellow who had tried to pray there. i think he was praying that somehow the temple would fall and so that the jewish temple could be rebuilt. i'm not really sure, but he'd obviously been beaten, and so, you know- machine guns, the whole thing; nobody firing them, but the tension is palpable over there. nevertheless, after- thanks to our good arab guide, we were able to get in. we couldn't do any video taping in terms of interviews, but we were able to get just a vision of the
city of acre in palestine, which is now the city of acre in israel. after many years in prison he was allowed to live in various houses outside the prison walls but always confined to that area. the bahai world center is now located across the bay in haifa, israel. and the resting place of bahÁ'u'llah outside of the city of acre in an area called bahji is where the shrine of bahÁ'u'llah is located. so both the cities of acre and haifa are sacred ground to the bahais. there are many misconceptions about the bahai faith; one of them is that the bahai faith is a syncretism or a mishmash of previous religions. or merely a conglomeration of 20th century and late 19th century ideas and philosophies attached to religion. this is far from the case. the bahai faith has it's own independent prophet, it's own independent scripture so it is quite obviously an independent religion. and it was deemed as such by a muslim court in the 1940s as not a sect or an offshoot of islam but as an independent religion. the other misconceptions about the bahai faith vary from place to place throughout the
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5